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The Pembridge Villas Surgery

The Pembridge Villas Surgery

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Child Immunisation

Child Health Service
Our health visitor is available on Wednesday mornings 10.00-11.30am walk-in clinic. Dr Ramsden and Dr Mistry also carry out baby checks on Wednesday mornings. We provide full childhood immunizations by booked appointment with the nurses.

If a vaccine is given when a baby still has maternal antibodies to the disease, the antibodies can stop the vaccine working. This is why routine childhood immunisations do not start until a baby is two months old, before the antibodies a baby gets from its mother have stopped working. This is also why it is important for parents to stick to the immunisation schedule, as a delay can leave a baby unprotected. A delay can increase the chance of adverse reactions to some vaccines, such as pertussis (whooping cough).

The surgery is only able to provide routine childhood vaccines according to the NHS schedule. Where parents wish their children to have additional vaccines, they will need to approach a private provider.


Vaccination Schedule

At two months old:
* Diptheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), polio and Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) (DTaP/IPV/Hib) - one injection
* Meningococcal B - one injection
* Rotavirus - oral vaccine 
* Pneumococcal - pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) - one injection
At three months old:
* Diptheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), polio and Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) (DTaP/IPV/Hib) - one injection
* Rotavirus - oral vaccine
At four months old:
* Diptheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), polio and Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) (DTaP/IPV/Hib) - one injection
Meningococcal B - one injection
* Pneumococcal - pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) - one injection
At age 1:
* Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) and meningitis C (Hib/MenC) - booster dose in one injection
* Measles, mumps and rubella (German measles) (MMR) - one injection
* Pneumococcal - pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) - one injection
* Meningococcal B - one injection
Three years four months to five years old (pre-school):
* Diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough) and polio (dTaP/IPV or DTaP/IPV) - one injection
* Measles, mumps and rubella (German measles) (MMR) - one injection
13 to 18 years old:
* School leaving booster usually given by school nurses

 

Meningitis B

 

Meningitis B is a new vaccine to prevent meningitis and it is being offered to babies who were born on or after 1st May 2015 as part of the routine NHS childhood vaccination programme.  The Men B vaccine is recommended for babies aged 2 months, followed by a second dose at 4 months, and a booster at 12 months. It can be combined with the primary immunisations. If babies are older than 2 months they will get it in 2 doses. The doses are 8 weeks apart or more (for the first 2). This is an entirely optional vaccination.

 

Babies who were born before 1st May 2015 will have to have it given privately. Please note we are not allowed to offer this as a private service to our registered patients, therefore it will have to be administered out of surgery.

 

One of the places Men B can be administered is The Portland Hospital – please contact the Children’s Services Enquiry Line on 020 3411 0835 for more advice on the paediatric vaccination services available at The Portland Hospital.

 

 

 

Further reading

There are some excellent websites that will answer all your questions and queries about immunisation and vaccination. If you are worried about giving the MMR vaccine, you should access the MMR site.

 



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